Toilet paper, tampons, cotton swabs, and baby wipes are all personal care staples that, perhaps surprisingly, come with hefty environmental costs. From upstream problems, like logging crucial boreal forests for wood pulp that becomes toilet paper, to post-use issues like the centuries it can take a tampon to biodegrade, many of these single-use products come with serious environmental costs. There are smarter, more ecologically sound choices to make for almost every item, and some may even be upgrades. Here’s how to choose personal products wisely. Problem: Much of the toilet paper in the US is made from virgin-wood pulp sourced from Canadian boreal forests, which are a crucial carbon sink. The Natural Resources Defense Council, a nonprofit, recently released a report finding that the average four-person US household uses more than 100 lbs (45 kg) of toilet paper a year, “far outpacing the rest of the world and driving a dangerous ‘tree-to-toilet pipeline’ whereby trees are converted into pulp, turned into toilet paper, and flushed away.”  Better choice: Single-ply paper made from recycled pulp. The NRDC offers a handy guide to which brands use post-consumer waste to make toilet...