Suppliers can take advantage of aerospace sector growth by understanding original equipment manufacturers’ requirements. After giant aerospace companies duke it out for lucrative defense and commercial airline contracts, the subcontracting games begin. Opportunities can be plentiful, but shops in unfamiliar territory can get themselves into trouble when bidding on projects. Machine shops new to aerospace machining should be aware of the risks, not just the rewards. Machining aerospace parts is different than any other industry because security is paramount. Shops need to be prepared for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to drive hard negotiations and to not underbid on a contract. And while the opportunities are there, OEMs are anything but forgiving and make the highest demands for quality and precision. If suppliers are not aware of the complexities of aerospace machining, they can be stuck in a contract they can’t get out of and lose money every time they machine a part. Anyone looking at processing complete components may want to do a little more homework to fully understand the OEM’s requirements before they get started. With roughing and semi-finishing, rules are mo...